Racial Justice Book Discussions

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The YWCA of Northwest Ohio Virtual Book Discussion Group is free and open to all adults featuring themes of racial and social justice. Groups meet via Zoom and the meeting link will be sent prior to the listed discussion date. To register for a book discussion group, click your selection below.

 

*This book is available in all formats through @ToledoLibrary, on the Libby App, Amazon, Barnes and Noble.

 

PREVIOUS BOOK DISCUSSIONS

 

The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story by Nikole Hannah Jones is a book that speaks directly to our current moment, contextualizing the systems of race and caste within which we operate today. It reveals long-glossed-over truths around our nation’s founding and construction—and the way that the legacy of slavery did not end with emancipation, but continues to shape contemporary American life.

 

 

 

 

Ibram X. Kendi’s concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America–but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. Instead of working with the policies and system we have in place, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it.

 

 

 

 

 

The story begins in 1619—a year before the Mayflower—when the White Lion disgorges “some 20-and-odd Negroes” onto the shores of Virginia, inaugurating the African presence in what would become the United States. It takes us to the present when African Americans continue a journey defined by inhuman oppression, visionary struggles, stunning achievements, and millions of ordinary lives passing through extraordinary history.

 

 

 

 

 

One of today’s most insightful and influential thinkers offers a powerful exploration of inequality and the lesson that generations of Americans have failed to learn: Racism has a cost for everyone—not just for people of color.

 

 

 

 

 

A deeply researched and transporting exploration of the legacy of slavery and its imprint on centuries of American history, How the Word Is Passed is beautifully written and illustrates how some of our country’s most essential stories are hidden in plain view.

 

 

 

 

A must-read, 26 artists and scholars, who are immigrants or have ties to multiple countries, reflect on race, ethnicity, nationality, belonging, and the legacy of colonization mostly in the context of a post-2016 America consumed by tensions over immigration and the question of which bodies are welcome.

The strength of this collection is in its diversity—of ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexuality, privilege, experience, and writing style. A gift for anyone who understands or wants to learn about the breadth of experience among immigrants to the U.S.

By turns heartbreaking and hilarious, troubling and uplifting, these “electric” essays come together to create a provocative, conversation-sparking, multivocal portrait of modern America (The Washington Post)